Cataract eye drops

Eye Drops To Prevent Or Cure Cataracts?

Cataracts present a massive healthcare and social problem. The only effective solution so far is cataract surgery, which can be out of reach for many because of its cost.

Chances are if you have cataracts, you would have heard of people talking about eye drops for cataracts. Some claim it helps to dissolve cataracts and some claim to an extent it prevents cataracts.

If such an eye drop is possible and can be made available affordably, it could have far-reaching implications for the eye health of millions of people worldwide.

But here’s what we know so far about eye drops for cataracts.

Officially, testing is underway for a new drug to solve this dilemma. Researchers based in the US have created a drug that might be able to dissolve cataracts and can be delivered directly into the eye via an eyedropper.

If you want to read up on the story and science behind the eye drops that dissolve cataracts, read this article from The Ophthalmologist.

So, is there really such a thing as eye drops for cataracts and will it work?
Can eye drops actually help and cure cataracts?

Here’s the deal. Despite its remarkable promise, the treatment that dissolves cataracts has yet to be tested on humans. The drug is slated to enter clinical trials and strict regulations are put in place to ensure that there are no extreme side effects associated with new drugs.

Furthermore, it is unclear whether improvement in the clarity of lenses from the use of this eye drop will result in vision improvement comparable to that produced by cataract surgery.

But hey, that’s a great step forward. Unfortunately, it will be some time before it can be proven that these drops work without producing any life or vision-threatening side effects.

However, don’t confuse this with the homoeopathic cataract remedies you can currently find on the market. Do a quick Google search on eye drops for cataracts and you will be bombarded by ads trying to sell you a variety of cataract eye drops.

Here is a screenshot of the available eyedrops for purchase online: 

 

You might have read about Can-C or perhaps Cineraria Homeopathic eye drops or even Ethos Bright Eyes for cataracts. “Cineraria” the principal ingredient in these eye drop is highly recommended online as a traditional homoeopathic remedy claiming it has the capacity to clear and dissolve obstructing fibrils in the lens and is gluten-free.

Despite all the claims and testimonials you read, I would strongly advise consumers not to purchase these homoeopathic eye drops over the Internet.

As with many of the therapeutic goods being sold on the Internet, these products:

  • Are not recognized or approved cataract treatments
  • They have not been evaluated by authorities for safety or effectiveness

The Internet can be a convenient way to access therapeutic goods, but remember online purchases of drugs and medicine should be approached with caution.

Remember, The Food and Drug Administration has not approved any drops that cure or delay cataracts.

Much more research is needed to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of these eye drops on humans, and whether these drops also can prevent cataracts from forming in ageing eyes.

In the meantime, the only solution right now is surgery.

If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to me to discuss whether surgery is right for you. I’ve also written a detailed guide on cataract and cataract surgery here.

Most eye doctors suggest considering cataract surgery when your cataracts begin to affect your quality of life or interfere with your ability to perform normal daily activities, such as reading or driving at night.

It’s up to you and your doctor to decide when cataract surgery is right for you. Cataracts can worsen faster in people with diabetes. Take time to consider the benefits and risks of cataract surgery with your doctor.

If you choose not to undergo cataract surgery now, your eye doctor may recommend periodic follow-up exams to see if your cataracts are progressing. How often you’ll see your eye doctor depends on your situation.

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